Cycle 3 – Reflection – Dylan Van Beek

Throughout the semester I applied existing knowledge in unity, games design and programming and combined it with research into new areas of games design that I had not yet explored.  This allowed for me to expand upon my current knowledge in some areas, as well as learn completely new elements in others.  With any gaps in my knowledge, for example, in scene swapping, I could look at the learning resources provided throughout the semester.  If there was a problem with a specific coding or level design question I could contact my colleges and they would generally be able to help me out, otherwise I would use the vast resources of the internet to fill in the void in my knowledge.

In addition to the technical skills gained through individual research and group collaboration there was also the element of being able to work in a likeminded team, who each had their own goals and ideas that they could bring to the table, but then I designed a game that had my own spin on it, or utilise their ideas into my own game.  However, with others ideas being brought to the table there sometimes became a debate of ideologies, and made me question my own ideas in a reasonable manner, and I’m sure it allowed the other group members to do the same.  It also allowed for new connections to be made, and with good communication we stayed on top of workloads and knew where everyone was at most of the time.

During the semester, there were strategies that seemed to work, and others that didn’t in managing communication.  The main mode of communications was Facebook Messaging that enabled us to discuss ideas out of class, arrange meeting times and share concepts or express any issues we were having.  All group members had a quick response time which allowed everyone to know it’s a reliable source of communication.   Also, with previous teams, the level of communication hasn’t been as good, however, the team cohesion allowed everyone to feel part of it and their opinions mattered.  The team also didn’t just shut down ideas, but could discuss and reasonably conclude and resolve any matter which would arise.  For example, in Cycle 2, debates sparked about the topic on which we should focus on for our overriding theme and feel of the game.  Also, each of us had our own past experiences with game design subjects which was all able to be brought to the table. Debates were overcome because we had mutual respect for other member’s ideas, and each of us made us all question our own ideas and opinions.   Furthermore, most activities were completed in the workshop, and uploaded later that week for remaining group members to review and comment on.

Furthermore, each of our responsibilities were delegated with reasonableness and we completed activates on time, most of the time, and if there was ever an issue we could just communicate online to resolve any problems.  These problems may include technical problems with our game, or studio work queries that may have been overlooked in the workshops.

Cycle 3 – Playtest Report – Dylan Van Beek

Playtesting was completed by following the goals outlined in Activity 6: Playtesting.  From this it was decided to playtest the game a script would be spoken to each participant before the game was tested.  This was just to allow the play tester to understand what was expected of them.  Below is the script:

I have some test instructions to read to you. You’re one of several people who will be helping us out on this test and since it’s important that I cover all the same points with each person, I’ll read through this so I’m sure I present everything to everyone in the same way.

The test today should last about 15 minutes and you can take a break or leave at any time. If you would like to take a break, or just want to stop –just let me know.

It is important to remember that we are evaluating our game, not you. You cannot make any mistakes here today. If you have any difficulty with any part of any task, it’s very important to us and it will give us clues on how to improve future versions of the game.

Also, please be completely frank and outspoken about any opinion or problem you have.

During this evaluation, one of the most important and interesting things for me to capture is what you think about as you do the tasks we give you.

  • To do this, I’m going to ask you to THINK ALOUD as you work
  • What I mean by “think aloud” is that I want you to tell me EVERYTHING you are thinking, why you are pressing each button, and everything you are doing and thinking from the time we start the evaluation until I ask you to complete the last survey
  • I would like you to talk constantly
  • I don’t want you to plan what you’re going to say or try to explain to me what you are saying
  • Just act as if you were alone in this room speaking to yourself
  • If you are silent for a long period, I’ll prompt you to think aloud.

Since thinking aloud is often unusual for people to do, I’d like you to practice thinking aloud. I’d like you to tell me how many windows there are in the place you live, but to think aloud while you are working out this number.

Let’s have you start the test. Pretend that you are at home, and you just downloaded this game. From this point, just do what comes naturally to you, and remember to always think aloud.


After the script was read the players thoughts were recorded via note taking whilst they played the game.  These notes were as follows:

Play Tester 1: Vincent Bornaghi

  • Enjoyed the menu
  • Thought mapping F to the attack button was a bit out of reach
  • Liked the story overview
  • Seemed to find enjoyment with killing blobs
  • Enjoyment stemmed from killing blobs over the platforming
  • The tight platforming took some attempts and he fell off trying to get a run up for the next jump
  • Thought the boss battle needed some feedback when you hit them but liked the implementation of a boss

Play Tester 2: Joseph Koppe

  • Enjoyed the background and positioning of assets
  • Enjoyed how you had to walk along the roof of the houses
  • Enjoyed how it felt like an escape from the city
  • Much more of a fan of the tight platforming
  • Took time, but not as much time as Vincent to get through the platforming
  • Liked the boss battle and how it was created

Play Tester 3: Ty Jones

  • Enjoyed killing enemies
  • Found jumping onto platform challenging (Jumping didn’t feel as smooth)
  • Would have liked to swing sword and run instead of letting go of right to do so
  • Liked the character animation
  • Found the sound effects funny
  • Would have liked sound effects for big enemies and the boss battle and bouncing on spring cubes
  • Didn’t go too well in platforming, but enjoyed it and persisted through

 

Play Tester 4: Sam Parer

  • Liked the jump sound effects
  • Enjoyed the storyline
  • Played through the game well
  • Thought F for attack might be a bit clunky but got used to it
  • Enjoyed the level of difficulty in the platforming
  • Seemed to find enjoyment at the silly blob sprites and sounds
  • Enjoyed how it seemed to be an escape of the town and liked the final battle background

Play Tester 5: Jordan Brook

  • Enjoyed killing enemies
  • Found jumping onto platform challenging (Jumping didn’t feel as smooth)
  • Would have liked sound effects for big enemies and the boss battle and bouncing on spring cubes
  • Didn’t go too well in platforming
  • Liked the setting

 

Once these notes were recorded the play testers were asked to complete a short survey which correlated to our Activity 6: Playtesting.  This would mean we could test our game as well as test our goals for playtesting.  The following survey/survey results was obtained.

Thank you for testing this game. Please answer these questions as accurately as you can.

For each of the following statements, please rate 1 to 5, 1 being strongly disagree, 5 being strongly agree.

  1. The game was easy to learn how to play.
    1. Vincent:5
    2. Joseph:5
    3. Ty:5
    4. Sam:5
    5. Jordan:5
  2. The game was fun to play.
    1. Vincent:4
    2. Joseph:5
    3. Ty:5
    4. Sam:4
    5. Jordan:4
  3. The game was frustratingly difficult.
    1. Vincent:3
    2. Joseph:2
    3. Ty:3
    4. Sam:1
    5. Jordan:2
  4. The game was boringly easy.
    1. Vincent:2
    2. Joseph:2
    3. Ty:2
    4. Sam:1
    5. Jordan:2
  5. The game’s controls made it easy to do what I wanted.
    1. Vincent:2
    2. Joseph:3
    3. Ty:3
    4. Sam:4
    5. Jordan:1
  6. The game’s visuals were enjoyable to look at.
    1. Vincent:5
    2. Joseph:5
    3. Ty:5
    4. Sam:5
    5. Jordan:4
  7. I always understood what I should do next to achieve my goal.
    1. Vincent:5
    2. Joseph:5
    3. Ty:5
    4. Sam:5
    5. Jordan:4
  8. I would be interested in playing this game again.
    1. Vincent:5
    2. Joseph:5
    3. Ty:5
    4. Sam:5
    5. Jordan:4

Finally, please rank the items in the following list. Put the number 1 next to the aspect which you consider the most well done in this game. Then put a 2 next to the aspect which you consider the next most well done aspect of the game. Continue the numbering in order of how well each aspect was done. Put the highest number next to the aspect which you consider the least well done in this game. Please use each number only once in the list.

 

Vincent Joseph Ty Sam Jordan
Controls 5 4 6 3 6
Gameplay 1 3 2 6 2
Visuals 3 2 5 2 1
My Character 2 1 4 1 4
Audio 4 6 1 5 5
Enemies 6 5 3 4 3

Recommendations for improvement 

With the survey results being pretty spread out, main recommendations will be coming from the comments that players made while play testing the game.   The elements that play testers seemed to find frustrating was the jumping hit box where the player wouldn’t jump even though they were on the platform.  To improve this implementation of a rectangular collider box of the player would be done.  This would hopefully make it easier for the player to jump when they are on the platform.

Furthermore an in game menu would have come in handy for playtesting, just to pause the game at certain intervals, and also some background music would really have assisted with the overall feel of the game

Cycle 3 – Activity 6 – Playtest Planning

The first playtesting report is selected for play testers from the IGB100 course, and other students with various degrees of knowledge about gaming and can provide in depth data.  The main goals of the playtesting report is to assess the level of difficulty the levels provide, which in turn leads to the amount of fun the player has, as well as measure how close we are to obtaining our PX Goals.

The second playtesting report conducted is for Bob, a man who fits our target audience. Bob is a 51-year-old with a gaming background in doom, Warcraft, StarCraft, Fifa and indie games.  He is an old gamer with about 30 years’ experience under his belt.  We aim to market this game to people like Bob’s life and play style.

Resources for the playtesting report include: playtesters, playtesting script, game, playtesting survey and note

**If you cant view the full table, it can be downloaded here –> Playtest Plan**

Date Session Participants (number and characteristics Overall approach, including resources required Session Goals Player Story/Stories Method How to Analyse
What to measure How to test
29/5/17 1-3 pm Participants: 5

Characteristics: Confidants

The play tester will be read the playtesting script, then asked to play the game. Through the playthrough the play tester will be asked to speak aloud and important notes will be recorded.  As well other notes will be gathered.  Furthermore, after the testing, the play tester will be asked a series of questions via a survey to be analysed.

Overall we wish to test two factors:

Is the basic idea of the game enjoyable?

Does the gameplay meet our player experience goals?

Goal 1: Test the skill level of platforming and movement flow “As an owner of an artefact, I want my boots to support my jumping so I can jump over obstacles and traverse the world.”

“As a knight I will use my sword to assist me in finding the person who stole my artefact so I can recover it.”

The seeming platforming difficulty

Time taken to progress through the level

Amount of falls off platforms

Via progression through the levels

Record time taken to progress through platforms

Record of spoken communication in gameplay

Review notes and formulate ideas to address the issues.  The comments may include suggestions.   Visual responses by the play tester.
Goal 2: Test the level of enjoyment and frustration progressing through the levels “As a peasant, I want my treasure to be returned to me so I can once again own my artefact.”

“As a player I wish to explore the game world to find fragments to open the door to the next level.”

The level of frustration at the levels

Verbal or physical signs of the play tester

Self-reported communication

Gameplay observation

Survey/Interview questions

Review notes and formulate ideas to address the issues.  The comments may include suggestions.   Visual responses by the play tester.
Goal 3: Test the fighting mechanics “As a civilian of the village, I want to use my sword to defeat enemies and progress through the world.”

“As a player, I want to cut down any obstacle to find my lost items.”

Quickness of enemies defeated

Self-reported analysis of enemy battles

Reaction of enemy’s deaths/not dying

Amount of health lost

Gameplay observations

Survey/interview questions

Review notes and formulate ideas to address the issues.  The comments may include suggestions.   Visual responses by the play tester.
Date Session Participants (number and characteristics Overall approach, including resources required Session Goals Player Story/Stories Method How to Analyse
What to measure How to test
29/5/17 1-3 pm Participants: 1

Characteristics: BOB

The play tester will be read the playtesting script, then asked to play the game. Through the playthrough the play tester will be asked to speak aloud and important notes will be recorded.  As well other notes will be gathered.  Furthermore, after the testing, the play tester will be asked a series of questions via a survey to be analysed.

Overall we wish to test two factors:

Is the basic idea of the game enjoyable for bob?

Does the gameplay meet our player experience goals?

Goal 1: Test if Bob likes the skill level of platforming “As an owner of an artefact, I want my boots to support my jumping so I can jump over obstacles and traverse the world.”

“As a knight I will use my sword to assist me in finding the person who stole my artefact so I can recover it.”

The seeming platforming difficulty

Time taken to progress through the level

Amount of falls off platforms

Via progression through the levels

Record time taken to progress through platforms

Record of spoken communication in gameplay

Review notes and formulate ideas to address the issues.  The comments may include suggestions.   Visual responses by the play tester.
Goal 2: Test if the style of gameplay suits bobs style of gameplay that he enjoys “As a peasant, I want my treasure to be returned to me so I can once again own my artefact.”

“As a player I wish to explore the game world to find fragments to open the door to the next level.”

The level of frustration at the levels

Verbal or physical signs of the play tester

Self-reported communication

Gameplay observation

Survey/Interview questions

Review notes and formulate ideas to address the issues.  The comments may include suggestions.   Visual responses by the play tester.
Goal 3: Test if bobs fighting skills match or are somewhat on par with the enemies and skill cap of the game “As a civilian of the village, I want to use my sword to defeat enemies and progress through the world.”

“As a player, I want to cut down any obstacle to find my lost items.”

Quickness of enemies defeated

Self-reported analysis of enemy battles

Reaction of enemy’s deaths/not dying

Amount of health lost

Gameplay observations

Survey/interview questions

Review notes and formulate ideas to address the issues.  The comments may include suggestions.   Visual responses by the play tester.

Cycle 3 – Activity 4 – Mechanics, Objects and Rules

Using the player stories from Activity 3, think about fundamental mechanics of game play

Fundamental mechanics

Physics

It’s a platformer where the player can move left, right and jump as well as swing their sword to fight enemies

Unreal gravity is applied to make the player fall and fall when jump with inaccurate jumping height for more fun

Economy

Keys that are needed to be collected to unlock the door to the next level

Very simple economy, manage health

Health packs at random locations to restore some health to the player

Customization on equipment for different swords.  Modifications statistic wise would include: range, power, speed.  More of a triangle scheme to make the player able to make choices depending on their preferred play style.  (This might not be able to be implemented in this version of the game, but would be implemented in later iterations)

Progression

There are set levels that the player must traverse through

Enemies provide a challenge with risk of death

Player is inclined to play through the levels to complete the predetermined storyline

Keys are used to unlock the door to the next level

Tactical manoeuvring

Positioning at a distance where the player can hit the enemy but the enemy can’t hit the player

 

Player stories

Provide example mechanics for 5 player stories

“As an owner of an artifact, I want my boots to support my jumping so I can jump over obstacles and traverse the world.”

The space bar is used to elevate the player in the air a set amount to stimulate jumping

As a civilian of the village, I want to use my sword to defeat enemies and progress through the world.”

The ‘f’ key is used to swing your sword to simulate simple fighting physics

“As a player I wish to explore the game world to find fragments to open the door to the next level.”

Progress through the levels by collecting keys that are in the level

“As a prince, I will recover health packs so that I can survive through the worlds.”

Collect health packs to enable the player to stay alive for longer and progress through the level

“As a knight I will use my sword to assist me in finding the person who stole my artifact so I can recover it.”

e.g. using the sword to defeat enemies and progress through the story to get to the end

Game Objects and Rules

Objects Attributes of Object Player interaction Relationship Between objects Rules and events
Player Object that holds the camera and allows the user to interact with the world The user can move this character along the XY axis Environment – Determines where the player goes

Enemies – Player swings sword to damage enemies

Sword – player holds sword and can use sword

Health packs – Player can collect health packs to regain missing health

Keys – Player must collect keys to unlock exit trigger door

Exit Trigger – if all enemies defeated and key collected, player can progress to next level

Player is controlled by WASD, uses F to swing sword and space bar to jump
Player Weapon Weapon can damage enemies Player can swing weapon Weapon will damage enemies Weapon is used by player swinging sword (Pressing F)
Environment Allows player to traverse levels Player has collisions with environment Health packs are in levels/environment

 

Enemies traverse environment

 

Player walks around environment

 No object can pass through environment
Enemy 1 Standard enemy Will cause standard damage to the player and can be destroyed with one hit Traverses left and right along ‘ground’ between two points, attacking the player if they come in range Deals 10 damage to player

Takes one hit to kill

Enemy 2 Heavy Enemy Will move and attack slower than the standard enemy but will deal twice as much damage and be twice as hard to kill Traverses left and right along ‘ground’ between two points, attacking the player if they come in range Deals 20 damage to player

Takes two hits to kill

Moves twice as slow as standard enemy

Is twice as large as standard enemy

Boss Boss Enemy Moves faster than regular enemies Traverses randomly around course Takes five hits to kill

Moves twice as fast as regular enemies

Deals 20 damage per hit

Key Once collected by player, player can progress to next level Collision with player means player collects the key Key cannot pass through level Collision with player will unlock next level
Platforms Used by player to traverse map Players will not be able to pass through platforms Enemies will not be able to pass through platforms Cannot be passed through by players
Exit Trigger Used by player to progress to the next level Player uses this to progress to net level Only the player can interact with the trigger Collision with trigger while conditions met means that player will progress to the next level
Health Packs Regains health of the player Restores player health Cannot pass through environment Collision with the player will mean that the player will restore missing health
Spring Bounces the player higher if jumped on Player moves higher when jumped on An immovable set object Collision with the player when the player is jumping will result in increased jump height

 

Playing with objects and rules

  • Change attributes, modify interactions and adjust rules
    • Increased Jump height
    • Increased walking speed
    • Increased enemy damage
    • Tweaking player range
  • Try to get a feel for the consequences of these changes
    • Some consequences were good, others made the game unbearable
    • A good balance between fun and frustratingly difficult was aimed for

Future iterations

In future iterations it was discussed and believed to be ideal if the player could switch weapons to suit their play style(such as a faster sword that does more damage, or a slower sword that is more powerful), as well as perhaps a ranged weapon and ranged enemies.  Furthermore, power ups and abilities such as wall climbing or double jump could be iterated in future levels to allow for more world exploration and a greater range of challenges and puzzles

Cycle 2 – Dylan Van Beek – Reflection

Through the process of this task my pre-existing knowledge of how unity works came into use when creating the Gameworld and the scripts to run actions within the world.  Most of the simpler tasks such as movement, importing assets and terrain construction had been done before, and hence could be completed without much assistance from Google or other means.  However, a lot of the scripting for the pickup and particle as well as instantiating objects was relatively new and difficult, but after researching on google was found to be quite interesting.  Other elements such as adding textures and standard assets were simple enough to complete and didn’t take much time after watching tutorials.  Furthermore, the biggest challenge in this task was trying to get timers to work, as “time.DeltaTime” is a function which I was not used to and took me a while to grasp.  Overall this mini game development was very useful in filling gaps in my knowledge in unity and proved to be quite fun.

Throughout the team exercises more information on the background of team members were discovered, although I believe it wasn’t capitalised on as much as it could have been.  For example, Vincent can animate/model but this wasn’t used to its full advantage in our project.  Although, the final product is believed work without this extra help, however, for the final development this might be considered a bit more.  As team members were cooperative and willing to change/adapt and converge/diverge ideas as they came from other members, teamwork was fluid and flowed smoothly, without any need for interventions or team management strategies.  Collaborative work was mostly completed in workshops, and the establishment of communication allowed for outer and further teamwork.  It is believed all members performed their tasks, and we mingled quite well.  All feedback from every member was considered, and responses to feedback if it didn’t work was explained so that all members were on board with what was happening.

As I am interested in game design, I found it very easy to stay motivated to complete tasks and prototypes.  In team scenarios, individual work was found to be balanced evenly between members and mostly completed in workshops, with some small completion work being done in my spare time.  In the individual work, I was happy with the gaps that I learnt from in this area of unity and I believe it will help greatly in the future as I now feel much more comfortable with the engine.

This game is designed to be fun and exhilarating, playing on the chaotic nature of a storm to rescue and race around a torn apart city to collect and save people and bring them to a safe zone.  Henceforth the main quality of life that it may bring is enjoyment and time well spent playing this game.

Cycle 2 – Dylan Van Beek – Playtest Report

Play testing was completed by following the goals outlined in Activity 6: Play testing.  From this it was decided to play test the game a script would be spoken to each participant before the game was tested.  This was just to allow the play tester to understand what was expected of them.  Below is the script:

I have some test instructions to read to you. You’re one of several people who will be helping us out on this test and since it’s important that I cover all the same points with each person, I’ll read through this so I’m sure I present everything to everyone in the same way.

The test today should last about 15 minutes and you can take a break or leave at any time. If you would like to take a break, or just want to stop –just let me know.

It is important to remember that we are evaluating our game, not you. You cannot make any mistakes here today. If you have any difficulty with any part of any task, it’s very important to us and it will give us clues on how to improve future versions of the game.

Also, please be completely frank and outspoken about any opinion or problem you have.

During this evaluation, one of the most important and interesting things for me to capture is what you think about as you do the tasks we give you.

  • To do this, I’m going to ask you to THINK ALOUD as you work
  • What I mean by “think aloud” is that I want you to tell me EVERYTHING you are thinking, why you are pressing each button, and everything you are doing and thinking from the time we start the evaluation until I ask you to complete the last survey
  • I would like you to talk constantly
  • I don’t want you to plan what you’re going to say or try to explain to me what you are saying
  • Just act as if you were alone in this room speaking to yourself
  • If you are silent for a long period, I’ll prompt you to think aloud.

Since thinking aloud is often unusual for people to do, I’d like you to practice thinking aloud. I’d like you to tell me how many windows there are in the place you live, but to think aloud while you are working out this number.

Let’s have you start the test. Pretend that you are at home, and you just downloaded this game. From this point, just do what comes naturally to you, and remember to always think aloud.

 

 

 

 

 

 

After the script was read the players thoughts were recorded via note taking.  These notes were as follows:

Play Tester 1: Vincent Bornaghi

  • Controls of the car felt unrealistic and somewhat annoying
  • The arrow indicating where to go could have been clearer in which way was the head
  • However, it was clear what he had to do
  • Would have liked the cars controls to be more fluid and smooth to control
  • Enjoyed the blue spray and the cubes as placeholders for debris
  • Was entertained by gameplay

Play Tester 2: Joseph Koppe

  • Enjoyed the city landscape
  • Enjoyed the blue spray and the cubes as placeholders for debris
  • Found the game intense from the dropping debris and time constraint
  • Thought the game could have had a red flashing overlay

Play Tester 3: Ty Jones

  • Enjoyed the city landscape
  • Understood that the location was some sort of broken city which the players were trying to escape from
  • Was entertained by gameplay and enjoyed the free drive after
  • Found the game intense from the dropping debris and time constraint (if it was a full game)

 

Play Tester 4: Sam Parer

  • Enjoyed the blue spray and the cubes as placeholders for debris
  • Enjoyed the city landscape
  • Was entertained by gameplay
  • Thought the game didn’t have an element of rush and maybe audio could assist in this

Play Tester 5: Jess Blae

  • Enjoyed the blue spray and the cubes as placeholders for debris
  • Understood that the location was some sort of broken city which the players were trying to escape from
  • Found the game intense from the dropping debris and time constraint (if it was a full game)

 

Once these notes were recorded the play testers were asked to complete a short survey which correlated to our Activity 6: Playtesting.  This would mean we could test our playtesting as well as text our goals for playtesting.  The following survey/survey results was obtained.

Thank you for testing this game. Please answer these questions as accurately as you can.

For each of the following statements, please rate 1 to 5, 1 being strongly disagree, 5 being strongly agree.

  1. The game was easy to learn how to play.
    1. Vincent:3
    2. Joseph:4
    3. Ty:5
    4. Sam:5
    5. Jess:5
  2. The game was fun to play.
    1. Vincent:4
    2. Joseph:5
    3. Ty:5
    4. Sam:4
    5. Jess:3
  3. The game was frustratingly difficult.
    1. Vincent:3
    2. Joseph:2
    3. Ty:1
    4. Sam:3
    5. Jess:2
  4. The game was boringly easy.
    1. Vincent:2
    2. Joseph:3
    3. Ty:2
    4. Sam:2
    5. Jess:3
  5. The game’s controls made it easy to do what I wanted.
    1. Vincent:2
    2. Joseph:3
    3. Ty:4
    4. Sam:4
    5. Jess:5
  6. The game’s visuals were enjoyable to look at.
    1. Vincent:4
    2. Joseph:4
    3. Ty:3
    4. Sam:3
    5. Jess:3
  7. I always understood what I should do next to achieve my goal.
    1. Vincent:5
    2. Joseph:5
    3. Ty:5
    4. Sam:5
    5. Jess:4
  8. I would be interested in playing this game again.
    1. Vincent:4
    2. Joseph:4
    3. Ty:5
    4. Sam:5
    5. Jess:5

Finally, please rank the items in the following list. Put the number 1 next to the aspect which you consider the most well done in this game. Then put a 2 next to the aspect which you consider the next most well done aspect of the game. Continue the numbering in order of how well each aspect was done. Put the highest number next to the aspect which you consider the least well done in this game. Please use each number only once in the list.

 

Vincent Joseph Ty Sam Jess
Controls 4 3 3 2 3
Gameplay 3 1 2 1 1
Visuals 2 2 1 3 4
My Character 1 4 4 4 2

Initial Studio Work

To gather game ideas, I went to Brisbane Times, and based off selected news articles a small scenario was created that could involve some game play.

10 news articles and game play experience:

  1. Missing woman http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/queensland/brisbane-police-appeal-for-public-help-to-find-missing-woman-20170325-gv6kod.html

Detectives of Acacia Ridge must search in the dark for the missing person before their flashlight runs out of battery

  1. Searching for Big Foot http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/comment/bigfoot-the-kraken-and-night-parrots-searching-for-the-mythical-or-mysterious-20170425-gvrtth.html

Player must try to collect all the big Foot clues to find bigfoot in a maze

  1. Russian Hacker http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/world/french-election-emmanuel-macron-campaign-targeted-by-russian-phishing-attack-20170425-gvrsni.html

Use

  1. Parking https://www.commercialrealestate.com.au/news/parking-isnt-as-important-for-restaurants-as-owners-think/

Player must park in the designated spots.  Better parking will award more points

  1. Decorating the area https://www.domain.com.au/advice/furniture-care-six-habits-that-are-ruining-your-dining-room-table-20170424-gvomu4/

Players must organise furniture in the house by moving stuff around and placing it in a more colourful order

  1. Baby’s motor skills http://paidcontent.essentialbaby.com.au/aptamil/toddlers/article/toddlers-fine-motor-skills-expect/

You are a baby controlling a RC vehicle around the house

  1. Escape the city http://paidcontent.traveller.com.au/american-express/offers/article/driving-force-hit-road-escape-city/

Run out of the city avoiding obstacles as fast as you can

  1. Cyclone rescue http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/business/mining-and-resources/anglo-american-takes-coal-hit-from-cyclone-debbie-20170424-gvrh1l.html

Drive collect passengers dropping them off at the safe bay while the hectic cyclone is around

 

These ideas were then presented to peers which enabled us to select some game ideas from this.  The ideas that most people liked were the detectives from acacia ridge and the cyclone crazy taxi style game.  Therefore, these game ideas were explored in some more concept

2 game ideas and sketches maybe:

20170425_190757

Next, we discussed good ideas and games which we could take inspiration from. Below is a summary of these findings.

Enviro-bear:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLbFz8jqe6c

This game captures the hectic nature of driving through a messy terrain.  Using programmer art style, it manages to still demonstrate how things can be chaotic in the first-person space.  We can use principles from this game to create a chaotic nature.